People's History of the NHS

Back
  • 04
  • NOV

Working Life History Survey

by Jack Saunders

Welcome to the Peoples' History of the NHS Working Life History Survey

Thank you for participating in this life history survey for the “cultural history of the NHS” project. This first page presents some basic facts about the project and its aims. This information will help you decide how you wish us to use your responses in our research. We will ask you to consent to the use of your answers before you take the survey.

In the lead-up to the 70th anniversary (2018) of its foundation, our project looks at how the existence of the NHS has affected life in Britain and what the NHS has meant to the people using it and working in it. One of the service’s major roles has been as an employer (today, five percent of people employed in Britain are employed by the NHS) and this survey is specifically directed at NHS EMPLOYEES past  and present. We would like to encourage all categories of staff – administrators, cleaners, porters, cooks, maintenance workers, technicians, laboratory workers, health care assistants, paramedics, nurses, doctors, managers and many more – everyone who works in and for the NHS to record their memories of working life and to reflect on their experiences of working for the National Health Service.

As historians, we think that work in the NHS has had a profound effect on life in Britain and want to encourage its workers to document what working for the service has meant to them. This survey’s main purpose is to enable you to record your experiences and memories of work, so it’s up to you what you want to share with us and which questions you want to answer. If you feel a question is intrusive, confusing or maybe just boring, feel free to leave it blank! Answer questions in as much or little detail as you like and in any way that you want.

After you complete the survey and return it to us, your responses will be anonymised and eventually sent to our archive at the Modern Records Centre. Once there, they will be made available to future researchers, meaning your memories will be preserved, helping contribute to future study of the NHS. Our project will also make use of your contributions, potentially using them as the basis for books, articles, presentations and online discussions about the history of the NHS. When we do this, your name will be anonymised, so that no material can be linked back to any individual. All of this information will be stored in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. The survey will be kept in digital and paper form, with the paper copy stored in a locked location and the digital copy encrypted.

Your name and contact information will be stored separately to the survey, will never be shared with anyone, and will only be accessible to our project team. Thanks once again for taking part in our project. Your memories are vitally important to our work and we hope you enjoy filling out our survey.

Participant’s Statement

I have read the Information Sheet. I agree that the research project has been explained to me to my satisfaction and I agree to take part.

I understand that if I decide at any time before the project is archived in 2019 that I no longer wish to take part, I can notify the researchers involved and my questionnaire will be immediately destroyed/deleted.

I consent to the processing ofmy personal information for the purposes of this research study only and I understand that such information will be treated as strictly confidential and handled in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998.

I consent to use of this material as part of the project and, as recommended by the Oral History Society, I consequently transfer all copyright ownership of my responses to the questionnaire to the project researchers.

I understand that the information I submit may be used in research publications and as described above.
Confidentiality and anonymity will be maintained and it will not be possible to identify me.


Who are you?

All sorts of factors – race, class, religion, education, region, gender etc. – shaped people’s experiences of
working in the NHS, and this section is designed to help us place your memories in a proper context. However,
if you don’t want to share some of this information with us, feel free to leave some or all of this section blank.

Name
Email
Year of Birth
Ethnicity
Gender
Main Occupation
 

What’s your background? (Where did you grow up? What did your parents do?
What education did you receive?)

How did you come to work for the NHS, and in what role (s) did you work? When and where?
 

Section 2: Memories
This section is about your memories of working life and hopefully gets right to the heart of people’s changing
experiences of work in the NHS. These questions aren’t aimed at any particular answer, so share whatever is
most important to you.

Could you describe a typical working day? (If you worked in more than one role, you can choose
whichever role you would like to describe, perhaps the one you did for the longest time)

What did you like and/or dislike about the job?
 

Do you think work in the NHS has changed over the years? If so, how? (For example, is discipline more
or less strict? Are people more or less professional? Is the work harder or easier? Have patients or staff
members changed?)

What did you think ofthe people you worked with? What about those doing different jobs to yours?
(Were you close to your co-workers? How much contact did you have with cleaners, canteen staff,
volunteers, porters, nurses, doctors, managers, security staff, reception staff, administrators etc.?)


Section 3: Attitudes
This section is about attitudes towards the NHS as organisation and your relationship with it.

Have you ever been involved in any activism related to the NHS? Select as many options as you like.
 

Please give details about your answers to the previous question.
 

Finally, what, if anything, does the NHS mean to you?
(As an employee? As a user of health services? As someone living in the UK?)

Welcome to the Peoples' History of the NHS Working Life History Survey

Thank you for participating in this life history survey for the “cultural history of the NHS” project. This first page presents some basic facts about the project and its aims. This information will help you decide how you wish us to use your responses in our research. We will ask you to consent to the use of your answers before you take the survey.

In the lead-up to the 70th anniversary (2018) of its foundation, our project looks at how the existence of the NHS has affected life in Britain and what the NHS has meant to the people using it and working in it. One of the service’s major roles has been as an employer (today, five percent of people employed in Britain are employed by the NHS) and this survey is specifically directed at NHS EMPLOYEES past  and present. We would like to encourage all categories of staff – administrators, cleaners, porters, cooks, maintenance workers, technicians, laboratory workers, health care assistants, paramedics, nurses, doctors, managers and many more – everyone who works in and for the NHS to record their memories of working life and to reflect on their experiences of working for the National Health Service.

As historians, we think that work in the NHS has had a profound effect on life in Britain and want to encourage its workers to document what working for the service has meant to them. This survey’s main purpose is to enable you to record your experiences and memories of work, so it’s up to you what you want to share with us and which questions you want to answer. If you feel a question is intrusive, confusing or maybe just boring, feel free to leave it blank! Answer questions in as much or little detail as you like and in any way that you want.

After you complete the survey and return it to us, your responses will be anonymised and eventually sent to our archive at the Modern Records Centre. Once there, they will be made available to future researchers, meaning your memories will be preserved, helping contribute to future study of the NHS. Our project will also make use of your contributions, potentially using them as the basis for books, articles, presentations and online discussions about the history of the NHS. When we do this, your name will be anonymised, so that no material can be linked back to any individual. All of this information will be stored in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. The survey will be kept in digital and paper form, with the paper copy stored in a locked location and the digital copy encrypted.

Your name and contact information will be stored separately to the survey, will never be shared with anyone, and will only be accessible to our project team. Thanks once again for taking part in our project. Your memories are vitally important to our work and we hope you enjoy filling out our survey.

Participant’s Statement

I have read the Information Sheet. I agree that the research project has been explained to me to my satisfaction and I agree to take part.

I understand that if I decide at any time before the project is archived in 2019 that I no longer wish to take part, I can notify the researchers involved and my questionnaire will be immediately destroyed/deleted.

I consent to the processing ofmy personal information for the purposes of this research study only and I understand that such information will be treated as strictly confidential and handled in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998.

I consent to use of this material as part of the project and, as recommended by the Oral History Society, I consequently transfer all copyright ownership of my responses to the questionnaire to the project researchers.

I understand that the information I submit may be used in research publications and as described above.
Confidentiality and anonymity will be maintained and it will not be possible to identify me.


Who are you?

All sorts of factors – race, class, religion, education, region, gender etc. – shaped people’s experiences of
working in the NHS, and this section is designed to help us place your memories in a proper context. However,
if you don’t want to share some of this information with us, feel free to leave some or all of this section blank.

Name
Email
Year of Birth
Ethnicity
Gender
Main Occupation
 

What’s your background? (Where did you grow up? What did your parents do?
What education did you receive?)

How did you come to work for the NHS, and in what role (s) did you work? When and where?
 

Section 2: Memories
This section is about your memories of working life and hopefully gets right to the heart of people’s changing
experiences of work in the NHS. These questions aren’t aimed at any particular answer, so share whatever is
most important to you.

Could you describe a typical working day? (If you worked in more than one role, you can choose
whichever role you would like to describe, perhaps the one you did for the longest time)

What did you like and/or dislike about the job?
 

Do you think work in the NHS has changed over the years? If so, how? (For example, is discipline more
or less strict? Are people more or less professional? Is the work harder or easier? Have patients or staff
members changed?)

What did you think ofthe people you worked with? What about those doing different jobs to yours?
(Were you close to your co-workers? How much contact did you have with cleaners, canteen staff,
volunteers, porters, nurses, doctors, managers, security staff, reception staff, administrators etc.?)


Section 3: Attitudes
This section is about attitudes towards the NHS as organisation and your relationship with it.

Have you ever been involved in any activism related to the NHS? Select as many options as you like.
 

Please give details about your answers to the previous question.
 

Finally, what, if anything, does the NHS mean to you?
(As an employee? As a user of health services? As someone living in the UK?)

" }
Read other posts:

Twitter Feed

The information is provided by us and while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. We only capture and store personal information with the prior consent of users. Any personal information collected as part of the user registration process or the submission of material (including, but not limited to, name, address, e-mail address) will be stored securely, and accessible only to members of the Cultural History of the NHS project team. We will not sell, license or trade your personal information to others. We do not provide your personal information to direct marketing companies or other such organizations. These opinions do not necessarily represent those of Warwick University or the Wellcome Trust.